TROUBLED Panamanian -flagged livestock carrier MV Jawan has had its Certificate for the Carriage of Livestock revoked by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

According to AMSA, this was because the vessel’s approved stability data could not be relied upon when loaded.

The former box-ship MV Jawan (IMO 9262895) was set to depart Portland to Pakistan this morning after the vessel’s classification society, on behalf of the flag state, provided an assessment of the ship’s stability.

But when moved from berth, the ship reportedly “demonstrated a motion that suggested the ship lacked stability”.

The master requested the vessel be returned to the berth and an AMSA marine surveyor boarded the vessel as soon as it was secured.

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Ships that visit Australia must have approved stability information and must calculate the vessel’s stability for every voyage in accordance with the Safety of Life at Sea Convention.

Where a master fails to properly determine a vessel’s stability, or the approved information the master uses is unreliable, the level of risk is considered “significant”.

AMSA chief executive Mick Kinley said revoking the ACCL was considered the only option.

“It is extremely concerning that the operators are unable determine the vessel’s stability in a loaded condition since its recent dry-docking and the operator and classification society seem unable to provide a plausible explanation for this situation,” Mr Kinley said.

“It’s a very basic requirement.”

AMSA expects the ship will be examined in detail by the operator and classification society.

This may include an ‘inclining experiment’ to fully determine the vessel’s condition and why the current data cannot be relied upon.

In a statement, AMSA said it also would be working with the vessel’s operator, flag state and classification society to determine how the problems originated.

The vessel twice had to turn back to Portland in late November while loaded with cattle, with images and footage distributed online showing the vessel listing alarmingly.

MV Jawan is still at Portland at the time of publication.

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