THE arrival of ship Coronado Bay has marked the first time a container vessel has fully utilised the new cargo terminal at the Port of Townsville.

Berth 4 Terminal is a $10m, 1.6ha upgraded facility which can accommodate an additional storage capacity of nearly 1,600 containers.

Swire vessel Coronado Bay will unload around 1,200 containers, carrying various cargo from manufacturing goods to lifestyle products and furniture.

The upgraded storage facility is part of the $30m Berth 4 Crane and Cargo project that will feature a new ship-to-shore crane that is scheduled for delivery in late 2020. The crane is expected to be in operation by the second quarter of 2021, increasing the berth capacity by around 20%.

Member for Townsville Scott Stewart said the new terminal at the port was already showing its importance.

“These upgrades at the Port of Townsville will help increase capacity and give customers more options,” he said.

“The port not only employs many people, it also creates many indirect jobs and drives economic growth which we are focused on as we can start delivering Queensland’s plan for economic recovery.”

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Townsville Port operations manager Mark Jenkins said the purpose-built facility will service the port’s growing trade requirements for decades to come.

“The port and local contractor Formset, jointly created a fit-for-purpose terminal that will further support the delivery of end-to-end logistics solution for our customers and community, he said.

“The maritime freight industry is vital to the North Queensland economy, not only supporting economic growth and international transport links but also providing employment for the region.”

While the port will soon release its annual financial figures, he said he was pleased that trade throughput had not suffered major impacts, despite coronavirus.

“As North Queensland grows, so does the port. We are proud to be a key provider of the economic stability of the region. The port benefits every single person living in North Queensland from fuel in their cars, to the building they live and work in, to jobs including jackaroos, train and truck drivers, crane operators, tradespeople, scientists and more,” Mr Jenkins said.

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